Too Bad I'm Illiterate!

Comments (20)

Literacy, FTW!

Leave it to a library to make reading fun and sexy again! I can't stop swooning over all the new books I got at the book sale today. I did my best to find the ones you recommended, but things were a little discombobulated. Should I look for Christmas Crime Scenes in with the Christmas books or the mystery books? (Answer: I found it in the mystery section. No, I did not purchase it. I'm seriously contemplating going back to find it tomorrow, though.)

Here's the complete list of tomes I picked up for myself:

  • A Million Little Pieces, by James Frey (recommended years ago)
  • The Secret Agent, by Francine Mathews (had catchy cover)
  • 1984, by George Orwell (recommended by Michael and Jace of Fuse!)
  • The Sound and the Fury, by William Faulkner (picked up because Faulkner is mentioned in Orange County, one of my favorite movies)
  • Moby-Dick, by Herman Melville (picked up as a classic and also because Rory mentions it to Dean in Season One of Gilmore Girls)
  • The New Home Book of Best Loved Poems, compiled by Richard Charlton MacKenzie (sounded like a good buy)
  • The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants, by Ann Brashares (loved the movie, which starred Alexis / Rory and therefore made this purchase twice as fitting)
  • A Pocket History of the United States, Ninth Edition, by Allan Nevins and Henry Steele Commager with Jeffry Morris (sounded useful; plus, I love history)
  • Foundation, by Isaac Asimov (recommended by Gilligan)
  • Second Foundation, by Isaac Asimov (also recommended by Gilligan)
  • White Oleander, by Janet Fitch (recommended by Thursday's Child and MajalisBlooms)
  • The Feminine Mystique, by Betty Friedan (sounded like an interesting read)
  • Ideas and Opinions, by Albert Einstein (his hair told me to buy the book)
  • The Swiss Family Robinson, by Johann David Wyss (don't remember buying this, honestly... surprise!)
  • Gone With the Wind, by Margaret Mitchell (want to read the book before seeing the movie)
  • Schindler's List, by Thomas Keneally (want to read the book before seeing the movie)
  • For Whom the Bell Tolls, by Ernest Hemingway (picked up as a classic and also because Rory mentions Hemingway to Jess in Season Two of Gilmore Girls)
  • Foundation's Edge, by Isaac Asimov (recommended by Gilligan)
  • The Last of the Mohicans, by James Fenimore Cooper (sounds like something I should have read by now)
  • Bridget Jones's Diary, by Helen Fielding (because I need something to read at the beach)
  • Brdiget Jones: The Edge of Reason, by Helen Fielding (another beach book)
  • The Catcher in the Rye, by J.D. Salinger (another book I should have read by now)
  • Message in a Bottle, by Nicholas Sparks (recommended many moons ago)
  • The Bourne Legacy, by Eric Van Lustbader (my dad owns the Bourne trilogy, and I thought this might be a fun addition to the collection)
  • Lord of the Flies, by William Golding (because I feel like starting a "Lord of the ___" collection)
  • A Walk to Remember, by Nicholas Sparks (recommended many moons ago)
  • The Original Illustrated Sherlock Holmes, by Arthur Conan Doyle (recommended by Joel; my dad owns pretty much every Sherlock Holmes story ever written, but I thought it'd be worthwhile to have my own copy)

Stack o' Books

Once I get through reading all these, I'll write up a list of the remaining recommendations for my brother. He works at a bookstore and can get me sweet deals. Feel free to keep adding to the list as you think of more titles!

While we're on the topic, I'll go ahead and plug two of my favorite book-related sites — dailylit.com and goodreads.com. DailyLit is a website that emails you the book(s) of your choosing in manageable snippets at whatever time of day you choose. I, for example, usually have something fun (like Alice in Wonderland) scheduled to arrive at 7 a.m. and something more serious (like Crime in Punishment) scheduled to arrive at 5 p.m. Reading two books at once isn't always ideal, but I do like that I always have something to look forward to when I wake up and when I get off of work. Plus, with the books online, I have less things to forget at home or at the office or in the car or wherever.

GoodReads, meanwhile, is a great place to keep track of all the books you have read, are currently reading, or plan to read. You and your friends can rate, review, and recommend books with a few simple clicks, which is a lot more streamlined than my "leave a comment!" method of asking for suggestions.

If, however, you do have any further suggestions of books or book-related websites, please let me know! I'll be busy alphabetizing my new purchases and trying to figure out how much stuff I can pile on my shelving unit before it explodes. Wish me luck!

Sanko

Sanko

Blech. Crime and Punishment. And since when do you wake up at 7 a.m.?

Rachelskirts

Rachelskirts

Sanko: I've been waking up at 7 a.m. for months now. I toodle around the internet for thirty or forty minutes before showering, though. (And hi, it's not like you would know, since you usually don't wake up until noon, bum.)

Gretch-a-sketch

Gretch-a-sketch

Thank you for the dailylit referral! I'm so going to use that.
Amazing book haul, by the way.

chris

chris

Hee hee! Pingie (it emails you rss feeds) delivered this post as "Too Bad Im Illiterate".

MJ Klein

MJ Klein

in Asia, we shower in the evening before bed. so we can get up fresh and do whatever we want before starting our day without wasting time on a shower! that would add more morning surf time to your schedule :)

Rachelskirts

Rachelskirts

Gretch-a-sketch: It's an amazing site! Glad you like it. :)

chris: Haha. Irony, FTW! (I hope my Feedburner email service didn't do that, though.)

MJ Klein: A lot of my friends shower at night, and I've actually tried it myself. However, my hair gets greasy and/or flat by the time morning rolls around, so I end up needing to shower again. I could wear a hat for the rest of my life, but that somehow just doesn't seem as fun.

Shawn K

Shawn K

I love 'The Swiss Family Robinson,' it's right up there with the likes of 'The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.' Now I should find where I put it and read it again.

@thattalldude

susan m

susan m

dang, that's an impressive list you compiled! no lightweight summer reading for you!

Honeybuns

Honeybuns

You might want to check your dates. I believe April 20 has passed.

James

James

re: book website.

I really love bookcrossing.com. It's good karma, and works really well if you have a bookcrossing zone near by.

Ben

Ben

Loved Lord of the Flies, found 1984 disappointingly blah, and for too many of the others I saw the movie rather than read the book (cultural fail).

I'm just starting God Behaving Badly and it's hilarious if you're interested in something more recent. Aphrodite workig at a telephone sex line in downtown London now that she has lost her influence? Classic.

Jamie

Jamie

What a nice haul!

I just finished all the Jen Lancaster books and have started Eat Pray Love. I have to see if it lives up to the hype!

Team Christmas

Team Christmas

Here you go, getting me started on books...sigh
2 of my favorites that are very prominently missing from your list are:
Farenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Oh, and props to Gilligan for suggesting Asimov!

Scrangie

Scrangie

Wow, lots of classics. And Asimov, nice!

But I hate Hemingway. I really, really, really hate Hemingway.

Kelly

Kelly

Books will drive me to the poor house soon enough because there is no such thing as too many. Lots of good books you have there! I hope you have fun reading them all. I applaud you for getting through Crime and Punishment. I've had that sitting on my bookshelf forever while I'm trying to work my way through Dostoevsky's The Brother Karamazov. I really love Russian literature though (random tangent from a literary geek).

To be random, a few books that I absolutely love (since I can't figure how to get bold or underline):
Anna Karenina - Leo Tolstoy
East of Eden - John Steinbeck
The Unbearable Lightness of Being - Milan Kundera
We the Living - Ayn Rand
Catch-22 - Joseph Heller

Anyways, enough ramblings from a literature geek. Happy reading! Cheers!

Thursday's Child

Thursday's Child

Very nice haul!

You'll have to let me know what you think of White Oleander when you get a chance. It's one of the better books I've read in recent history, for sure.

Here's a few more:

Lolita and Glory both by Vladimir Nabokov

No Country for Old Men Cormack McCarthy

East of Eden John Steinbeck

Enjoy your reading. :)

Blindsquirrel

Blindsquirrel

The Prophet - Khalil Gibran
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest - Ken Kesey

Joel

Joel

Boy, when you buy books you don't mess around!

Amazingly, I too just bought 1984 and Lord of the Flies at a Freemason rummage sale a week or so ago. Lord of the Flies was totally not what I expected it to be (I think I was expecting something along the lines of The Fly); I'll probably need some kind of scholarly introduction-preface thingy in order to really appreciate it. I'm half-way through 1984 and it's almost too depressing even for me (I like Edgar Allen Poe, for crying out loud). I'm already too aware of the danger of an oppressive socialist state. I guess it's my duty as a literary 21st-century American to read it though.

Ren

Ren

A Million Little Pieces will bore you. FYI.

CosaMostro

CosaMostro

Please do not waste your time on The Sound and the Fury.

Faulkner's stream-of-consciousness parlor trick is not worth the effort. It's nearly impossible to read for the first three sections, then falls apart into mixed metaphors and run-on sentences in the fourth.

Overrated, poorly written drivel.

Read anything at all by Cormac McCarthy before you spend a moment on S&F. He has the same expansive, descriptive talent as Faulkner and is equally adept at setting a dark, ambivalent mood. But he puts in the effort to actually craft a piece that makes some kind of sense. If you have a high tolerance for blood and gore, try Blood Meridian. If you want your heart ripped out, read The Road.